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Food Technologist

Kaihangarau Kai

Alternative titles for this job

Food technologists research, develop and improve food and drink products. They may also be involved in the processing, packaging, storage and safety of food to meet government and industry standards.

Pay

Food technologists with up to five years' experience usually earn

$50K-$75K per year

Senior food technologists with more than five years' experience usually earn

$75K-$100K per year

Source: NZIFST and Lawson Williams Consulting, 2019.

Job opportunities

Chances of getting a job as a food technologist are good due a shortage of workers and increasing demand for their services.

Pay

Pay for food technologists varies depending on skills and experience.

  • Graduate food technologists usually earn $50,000 to $60,000 a year.
  • Food technologists with two to four years' experience usually earn $60,000 to $75,000. 
  • Senior food technologists with five or more years' experience can earn $75,000 to $100,000. 

Sources: New Zealand Institute of Food Science Technology, 2019; and Lawson Williams Consulting Group, 2019.

(This information is a guide only. Find out more about the sources of our pay information)

What you will do

Food technologists may do some or all of the following:

  • develop new or improve current food and drinks
  • make test samples of food products and conduct trials
  • source and select ingredients for food products
  • manage or supervise development and production of food and drinks
  • improve efficiency of manufacturing processes
  • develop new or improve current food packaging
  • ensure food products meet specifications and standards (quality assurance)
  • investigate the nutritional properties of foods.

“My food technology work is a good balance between the office and the lab.”

Photo: Alberto Gonzalez Jordan

Alberto Gonzalez Jordan

Senior Food Technologist

Skills and knowledge

Food technologists need to have knowledge of:

  • food and drink products
  • food processing and production methods
  • food hygiene and quality standards
  • how to analyse and interpret research results
  • how to perform experiments and operate scientific equipment
  • how to write reports
  • maths and computer skills.

Working conditions

Food technologists:

  • usually work regular business hour, but may need to run factory trials at night or on weekends
  • usually work in laboratories, offices or factories
  • may travel overseas to clients' companies or factories, and attend local or international conferences and trade shows.

What's the job really like?

Alberto Gonzalez Jordan

Alberto Gonzalez Jordan

Senior Food Technologist

Where the passion started

Senior food technologist Alberto Gonzalez Jordan was interested in chemistry, physics, and science as a child. He says that having a curious mind is helpful for being a food technologist.

“When you’re cooking you ask yourself why is this food this colour? Or why do I have to keep this food in the fridge"?

Study in Spain, Ireland and France

Alberto studied for his first degree in food nutrition in Spain, followed by another degree in food technology. He then worked for Nestlé in product development, creating healthy diets for hospital patients.

In Ireland, Alberto got his Masters in food innovation and product design. After that, he wanted to take on more innovative and complicated projects so he completed a PhD in France.

University programme offers variety

Alberto works on different kinds of food technology projects for Massey University’s FoodPilot programme. He usually works on dairy and meat products but says clients are increasingly requesting plant-based products as meat substitutes.

At other companies with specialised products he could spend many years working on just one food product.

“The advantage of FoodPilot is that we're not always working with the same products.”

Raw milk to premium ice cream

Alberto recently developed premium ice cream from a farmer's raw cow's milk. He said the farmer was amazed to see the milk converted into a marketable product.

Entry requirements

To become a food technologist most employers require you to have a Bachelor's degree in food technology, food science or food engineering. A Master's degree is preferred.

Food technologists often complete on-the-job training programmes for specific products and processes.

Secondary education

A tertiary entrance qualification is required to enter further training. Useful subjects include home economics, maths, physics, chemistry and biology. 

Personal requirements

Food technologists need to be:

  • accurate
  • patient and persistent
  • able to work well under pressure
  • good at problem solving
  • good at planning and organising.

Useful experience

Useful experience for food technologists includes:

  • food processing or production
  • laboratory work
  • quality assurance
  • business management or marketing.

Physical requirements

Food technologists need to have good hand-eye co-ordination.

Find out more about training

Engineering New Zealand
(04) 473 9444 - hello@engineeringnz.org - www.engineeringnz.org
NZ Institute of Food Science and Technology (NZIFST)
(06) 356 1686 - rosemary@nzifst.org.nz - www.nzifst.org.nz
Check out related courses

What are the chances of getting a job?

Shortage of skilled food technologists

Demand for food technologists is expected to continue as the number of positions will grow 3% a year until 2026, according to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. Demand is strongest for qualified food technologists with three to seven years' experience.

However, the number of skilled, qualified food technologists is insufficient to meet demand. As a result, food technologist appears on Immigration New Zealand’s long-term skill shortage list. This means the Government is actively encouraging skilled food technologists from overseas to work in New Zealand.

Strong prospects for graduates with process engineering knowledge and industry experience

Some large food technology companies may have graduate recruitment programmes. Employers prefer graduates with broader qualifications that include some process engineering, rather than just food science. 

A postgraduate diploma can improve your chances of getting work if it includes an applied project for a food manufacturing company and getting hands-on industry experience. 

Types of employers varied

Most food technologists work for: 

  • food manufacturing companies such as dairy processing companies, breweries, food and vegetable processing companies, cereal manufacturers and commercial bakeries
  • private food research institutes such as Fonterra Research and Development Centre
  • Crown research institutes such as AgResearch and Plant & Food Research
  • universities.

Sources

  • De Barr, Tony, lead consultant, Manufacturing, Science and Technology, Technical Recruitment Solutions, careers.govt.nz interview, July 2019.
  • Immigration New Zealand, 'Long Term Skill Shortage List', 27 May 2019, (www.immigration.govt.nz).
  • Lawson, John, managing director, Lawson Williams Consulting Group, careers.govt.nz interview, July 2019.
  • Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, 'Food Technologist Occupation Outlook', 2019, (www.mbie.govt.nz).
  • New Zealand Institute of Food Science and Technology website, accessed May 2019, (www.nzifst.org.nz).

(This information is a guide only. Find out more about the sources of our job opportunities information)

Progression and specialisations

Food technologists may move into senior roles such as senior food technologist or technical manager. 

They may progress to jobs in areas such as:

  • marketing and sales
  • food safety authority
  • university lecturers

Food technologists may specialise in:

  • packaging
  • product development
  • production
  • quality assurance
  • policy and standards
  • technical sales
  • research and development.
Two food technologists examining vegetables in a laboratory

Food technologists improve the processing and safety of food

Last updated 20 August 2019